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Creating an additional domain controller in an existing domain

Please see Microsoft Site for additional detail expalnation: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc738032(WS.10).aspx

Creating additional domain controllers

If you already have one domain controller in a domain, you can add additional domain controllers to the domain to improve the availability and reliability of network services. Adding additional domain controllers can help provide fault tolerance, balance the load of existing domain controllers, and provide additional infrastructure support to sites.
More than one domain controller in a domain makes it possible for the domain to continue to function if a domain controller fails or must be disconnected. Multiple domain controllers can also improve performance by making it easier for clients to connect to a domain controller when logging on to the network. You can add additional domain controllers over the network or from backup media.
Before adding domain controllers you should thoroughly understand Active Directory and the requirements necessary to set up additional domain controllers in an existing domain. For more information, see Checklist: Creating an additional domain controller in an existing domain and Create an additional domain controller.

Using backup media to create additional domain controllers

With Windows 2000, the only way you can create an additional domain controller in an existing domain is by replicating the entire directory database to the new domain controller. With low network bandwidth or a large directory database, this replication can take hours or days to complete. With servers running Windows Server 2003, you can create an additional domain controller using a restored backup taken from a domain controller running Windows Server 2003. This backup can be stored on any backup media (tape, CD, or DVD) or a shared resource.
Using restored backup files to create an additional domain controller will greatly reduce the network bandwidth used when installing Active Directory over a shared resource; however, network connectivity is still necessary so that all new objects and recent changes to existing objects are replicated to the new domain controller.
It is recommended that you use the most recent backup available. Older backups require more network bandwidth for replication. The backup used cannot be older than the tombstone lifetime of the domain, which is set to a default value of 60 days (180 days in a forest that is created on a server running Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1 [SP1]).
If a domain controller that was backed up contained an application directory partition, it will not be restored on the new domain controller. To manually create an application directory partition on a new domain controller, see Create or delete an application directory partition.
When adding an additional domain controller using backup media, a System State backup taken only from a domain controllers running Windows Server 2003 can be used once it has been restored. For more information about how to restore a System State backup, see Restore System State data.
For general information about restoring backups, see Authoritative, primary, and normal restores.


Checklist: Creating an additional domain controller in an existing domain

Checklist: Creating an additional domain controller in an existing domain

Step Reference
(Optional) Review concepts about creating additional domain controllers over the network or by using backup media. Creating an additional domain controller

(Optional) Review concepts about security and other options available when using the Active Directory Installation Wizard. Using the Active Directory Installation Wizard

Verify that the server on which you will be installing Active Directory has an NTFS partition. Reformatting or converting a partition to use NTFS

(Optional) Review the role of a domain controller. Domain controllers

Verify that you are a member of the Domain Admins group in the domain where you will be adding the domain controller. Default groups

Verify that DNS is properly configured before installing Active Directory. Checklist: Verifying DNS before installing Active Directory

Create the domain controller. Create an additional domain controller


Using the Active Directory Installation Wizard
Updated: January 21, 2005
Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2
Using the Active Directory Installation Wizard
The Active Directory Installation Wizard installs and configures domain controllers, which provide network users and computers access to the Active Directory directory service. You can install Active Directory on any member server (except those with restrictive license agreements) using the Active Directory Installation Wizard. Using the wizard, you will define one of the following roles for the new domain controller:
• New forest (also a new domain)

For a checklist about creating a new forest, see Checklist: Creating a new forest.
• New child domain

For a checklist about creating a child domain, see Checklist: Creating a new child domain.
• New domain tree in an existing forest

For a checklist about creating a new domain tree, see Checklist: Creating a new domain tree.
• An additional domain controller in an existing domain.  This One! We will follow these steps if there is a domain ctrl in place – Cesar
For a checklist about creating an additional domain controller, see Checklist: Creating an additional domain controller in an existing domain.
Before using the Active Directory Installation Wizard, consider DNS configuration and support for existing applications.
DNS configuration
By default, the Active Directory Installation Wizard attempts to locate an authoritative DNS server for the new domain from its list of configured DNS servers that will accept a dynamic update of a service (SRV) resource record. If found, all the appropriate records for the domain controller are automatically registered with the DNS server after the domain controller is restarted.
If a DNS server that can accept dynamic updates is not found, either because the DNS server does not support dynamic updates or dynamic updates are not enabled for the domain, then the Active Directory Installation Wizard will take the following steps to ensure that the installation process is completed with the necessary registration of the SRV resource records:
1. The DNS service is installed on the domain controller and is automatically configured with a zone based on the Active Directory domain.

For example, if the domain that you chose for your first domain in the forest is example.microsoft.com, then a zone rooted at the DNS domain name of example.microsoft.com is added and configured to use the DNS Server service on the new domain controller.
2. A text file containing the appropriate DNS resource records for the domain controller is created.

The file called Netlogon.dns is created in the systemroot\System32\Config folder and contains all the records needed to register the resource records of the domain controller. Netlogon.dns is used by the Net Logon service and supports Active Directory on servers running non-Windows Server 2003 DNS.

If you are using a DNS server that supports the SRV resource record but does not support dynamic updates (such as a UNIX-based DNS server or a Windows NT DNS server), you can import the records in Netlogon.dns into the appropriate primary zone file to manually configure the primary zone on that server to support Active Directory.
If no DNS servers are available on the network, you can choose the option to automatically install and configure a local DNS server when you install Active Directory using the Active Directory Installation Wizard. The DNS server will be installed on the server on which you are running the wizard, and the server’s preferred DNS server setting will be configured to use the new local DNS server.
Before running the Active Directory Installation Wizard, ensure that the authoritative DNS zone allows dynamic updates and that the DNS server hosting the zone supports the DNS SRV resource record. For more information, see Checklist: Verifying DNS before installing Active Directory.
For more information, see Configure a DNS server for use with Active Directory. For general information about DNS integration with Active Directory, see DNS integration.
Support for existing applications
On servers running Windows NT 4.0 and earlier, read access for user and group information is assigned to anonymous users so that existing applications and some non-Microsoft applications function correctly.
On servers running Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003, members of the Anonymous Logon group have read access to this information only when the group is added to the Pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access group.
Using the Active Directory Installation Wizard, you can choose if you want the Anonymous Logon group and the Everyone security groups to be added to the Pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access group by selecting the Permissions compatible with pre-Windows 2000 Server operating systems option. To prevent members of the Anonymous Logon group from gaining read access to user and group information, choose the Permissions compatible only with Windows Server 2003 operating systems option.
When upgrading a domain controller from Windows 2000 to a Windows Server 2003 operating system, if the Everyone security group is already a member of the pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access security group (indicating backward compatibility settings), the Anonymous Logon security group will be added as a member of the pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access security group during the upgrade.
You can manually switch between the backward compatible and high-security settings on Active Directory objects by adding the Anonymous Logon security group to the pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access security group using Active Directory Users and Computers. For more information about adding members to a group, see Add a member to a group. For more information about default groups, see Default groups and Special identities.
Note
• If you select the Permissions compatible only with Windows Server 2003 operating systems check box when installing Active Directory and find that your applications are not functioning correctly, try resolving the problem by manually adding the special group Everyone to the Pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access security group, and then restarting the domain controllers in the domain. Once you have upgraded to applications compatible with the Windows Server 2003 family, you should return to the more secure Windows Server 2003 operating system configuration by removing the Everyone group from the Pre-Windows 2000 Compatible Access security group and restarting the domain controllers in the affected domain.


Create an additional domain controller
Updated: January 21, 2005
Applies To: Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 R2, Windows Server 2003 with SP1, Windows Server 2003 with SP2

To create an additional domain controller

1. Click Start, click Run, and then type dcpromo /adv to open the Active Directory Installation Wizard with the option to create an additional domain controller from restored backup files.
2. On the Operating System Compatibility page, read the information and then click Next.

If this is the first time you have installed Active Directory on a server running Windows Server 2003, click Compatibility Help for more information.
3. On the Domain Controller Type page, click Additional domain controller for an existing domain, and then click Next.
4. On the Copying Domain Information page, do one of the following:
• Click Over the network, and then click Next.
• Click From these restored backup files, and type the location of the restored backup files, or click Browse to locate the restored files, and then click Next.
5. On the Network Credentials page, type the user name, password, and user domain of the user account you want to use for this operation, and then click Next.

The user account must be a member of the Domain Admins group for the target domain.
6. On the Database and Log Folders page, type the location in which you want to install the database and log folders, or click Browse to choose a location, and then click Next.
7. On the Shared System Volume page, type the location in which you want to install the Sysvol folder, or click Browse to choose a location, and then click Next.
8. On the Directory Services Restore Mode Administrator Password page, type and confirm the password that you want to assign to the Administrator account for this server, and then click Next.

Use this password when starting the computer in Directory Services Restore Mode.
9. Review the Summary page, and then click Next to begin the installation.
10. Restart the computer.
Notes
• To perform this procedure, you must be a member of the Domain Admins group or the Enterprise Admins group in Active Directory, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. As a security best practice, consider using Run as to perform this procedure. For more information, see Default local groups, Default groups, and Using Run as.
• The /adv switch is only necessary when you want to create a domain controller from restored backup files. It is not required when creating an additional domain controller over the network.
• In step 3, when choosing the option to copy domain information over the network, all directory data for the domain in which this domain controller will be a member will be copied over your network connection. You will have the option to cancel non-critical replication, if necessary.
• In step 3, when choosing the option to copy domain information from restored backup files, you will need to first back up the System State data of a domain controller running Windows Server 2003 from the domain in which this member server will become an additional domain controller. Then, the System State backup must be restored locally on the server on which you are installing Active Directory. To do this using Backup, choose the option Restore files to: Alternate location. For more information about restoring backups, see Related Topics.
• If a domain controller that was backed up contained an application directory partition, the application directory partition will not be restored on the new domain controller. For information about how to manually create an application directory partition on a new domain controller, see Related Topics.
• If the domain controller from which you restored the System State data was a global catalog, you will have the option to make this new domain controller a global catalog.
• You can also use a smart card to verify administrative credentials. For more information about smart cards, see Related Topics.
• You cannot install Active Directory on a computer running Windows Server 2003, Web Edition, but you can join the computer to an Active Directory domain as a member server. For more information about Windows Server 2003, Web Edition, see Related Topics.
Information about functional differences
• Your server might function differently based on the version and edition of the operating system that is installed, your account permissions, and your menu settings. For more information, see Viewing Help on the Web.

How to fix issue with Symantec Endpoint client not installing due to a required reboot.

Problem computer: Windows Vista computer.
Problem: Symantec Endpoint Protection (SEP) Installation fails with the following error “Symantec Endpoint Protection has detected that there are pending system changes that require a reboot. Please reboot the system and rerun the installation.”

Solution: I rebooted the computer several and got the same result each time.

I found the registry key entry that I used to fix the problem.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\SessionManager\PendingFileRenameOperations
Delete the registry key

Install the software without restarting the computer

NOTE: If you are running Windows Vista look for this key – HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet001\Control\SessionManager\PendingFileRenameOperations

Answer was Posted on January 24th, 2009 under Symantec Endpoint Protection, Windows 2008 • Tags: Symantec Endpoint Protection, windows.